Faculty

Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

Photo of Jocelyn Glazier

Glazier, Jocelyn

Associate Professor
Chair, Professional Leadership and Practice

T: 919.843.0406
jocelyng@email.unc.edu
301G Peabody Hall
CB 3500

“Urging all of us to open our minds and hearts so that we can know beyond the boundaries of what is acceptable, so that we can think and rethink, so that we can create new visions, I celebrate teaching that enables transgressions ─ a movement against and beyond boundaries. It is that movement which makes education the practice of freedom.”

– bell hooks, Teaching to Transgress

Overview

Previously a teacher of high school English and English as a Second Language, Jocelyn Glazier entered graduate school to explore how to better support teachers in creating and enacting meaningful, equitable and transformative curricula and pedagogy. During her studies, she became particularly interested in the ways teacher education could be structured to help teachers address the needs of all students, especially those historically marginalized. She continued this line of inquiry as an assistant professor at George Washington University where she taught courses in research, literacy and multicultural education. Through her teaching and research, she worked with prospective and practicing teachers to develop ways to break cycles of oppression in schools and beyond and to support the learning of all students.

Glazier’s dissertation research included a yearlong study of an Arab/Jewish school in Northern Israel. There she explored the experiences of students and teachers as they engaged in the difficult process of learning about and ultimately understanding one another’s cultures and languages.

Glazier’s recent work consists of teacher education that aids practicing teachers in schools and adds to new knowledge. In one project, she assembled a group of English teachers to read and discuss multicultural literature, which they in turn would teach to their own students. Glazier introduced the teachers to discourse analysis so they could explore how they positioned themselves relative to race, ethnicity, gender or social class and in regard to the characters in the texts.  Through this close reading and discussion of multicultural texts, and in one-on-one classroom work with Glazier, the teachers in the study became more aware of how their own biases and prejudices tended to privilege certain forms of learning and thus, certain students.

Educational Background

  • Ph.D. 2000 - Michigan State University, Curriculum, Instruction and Educational Policy
  • M.A.T. 1991 - Tufts University, English Education
  • B.A. 1990 - Tufts University, English and American Studies

Doctoral Program Affiliation(s)

Ph.D. in Education - Teacher Education and Curriculum

Ed.D. in Curriculum & Instruction

Research Interests

  • Diversity and Multiculturalism
  • Professional Development/Teacher Education
  • Social and Cultural Studies
  • Literacy
  • Equity

Teaching Areas

  • Critical Pedagogy
  • Teacher Education

Courses

  • EDUC 600: Reinventing Teaching
  • EDUC 754: Teacher Education in the United States
  • EDUX 699: Study Group Research I
  • EDUX 700: Teacher as Researcher II

Honors & Awards

  • Nominated for Kappa Delta Pi/AERA Division K Early Career Research Award Early Career Award, 2006

Funded Research

  • 2007, Transforming the Real Lives of Students? Defining Transformative Practices
    Funding Source: Junior Faculty Development IBM Fund Award, UNC
    Role: Principal Investigator
  • 2007, The Impact of Service Learning on Pre-Service Professionals’
    Dispositions Towards Diversity

    Funding Source: Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education (SCALE), UNC
    Role: Co-Principal Investigator (with Dr. Harriet Boone)

Selected Professional Affiliations

  • Research in the Teaching of English
  • Anthropology and Education Quarterly
  • Teaching and Teacher Education
  • Urban Review
  • Israel Science Foundation
  • American Educational Research Association

Public Service

  • Discussion Leader, Carolina Summer Reading Program
  • Model Course Instructor, Explore Carolina
  • Presenter, Department of Public Instruction Subcommittee considering the Teacher for the 21st Century, Raleigh, NC (2006)

Selected Publications

McVee, M., Brock, C. & Glazier, J. (2008, forthcoming). Sociocultural positioning in literacy: Exploring culture, discourse, narrative and power in diverse educational contexts. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Glazier, J. (2008, forthcoming). The staying power of positionality: Exploring the challenge of repositioning when in the company of others. In McVee, M., Brock, C. & Glazier, J. (Eds). Sociocultural Positioning in Literacy: Exploring Culture, Discourse, Narrative and Power in Diverse Educational Contexts. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Glazier (2008, forthcoming). Positioning Theory in Educational Landscapes. In McVee, M., Brock, C. & Glazier, J. (Eds). Sociocultural Positioning in Literacy: Exploring Culture, Discourse, Narrative and Power in Diverse Educational Contexts. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Glazier, J., Hines, M., & Ricker-Wilson, C. (2007). Conversations: Learning to read critically: From high school to college to teacher education. In Kumashiro, K. and B. Ngo (Eds.). Six Lenses for Anti-Oppressive Education: Partial Stories, Improbable Conversations. (pp. 149-157). New York: Peter Lang

Glazier, J. (2007). Anti-Oppressive Pedagogy and Curriculum in Secondary English Methods: Focusing on Critical Literacy. In Kumashiro, K. and B. Ngo (Eds.). Six Lenses for Anti-Oppressive Education: Partial Stories, Improbable Conversations. New York: Peter Lang

Glazier, J. A. (2007).Tinkering Towards Socially Just Teaching: Moving from Critical Theory to Practice. Changing English, 14(3), 375-382.

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