MA in Educational Innovation, Technology, and Entrepreneurship (MEITE)

Program Description

The MEITE program will provide students with the core set of skills necessary to create educational innovations that are grounded in the learning sciences. This degree program will prepare students to design and build the learning environments of the future, by developing new educational technologies and also by developing new curricula and new organizational forms that align with the potential of these new technologies. These innovations may take place within traditional schools, but are just as likely to occur outside of schools—whether as Internet-based applications, as tablet computer software, or in non-traditional learning environments such as science centers, after school programs, or community-based organizations.

MEITE is a professional degree. Graduates will leave prepared to take leadership positions in the private and public sectors. While the program is housed in the School of Education, students will also take courses in the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the School of Information and Library Science, and the Department of Computer Science.

An internship with an innovative educational organization is a central part of the program. The Research Triangle region has a large number of innovative and entrepreneurial organizations that work in education. The internship will give students hands-on experience with how learning occurs in real-world contexts.

Overview

  • A 12-month, 36 credit-hour program that begins in August and ends in late July of the following year.
  • Students proceed through the program as a tightly-knit cohort.
  • Program and course work can be customized to each student’s interest, within the three strands of innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship.
  • Students complete a two-semester internship (Fall and Spring) in an innovative Research Triangle area educational organization.
  • In the summer after content coursework and internship is completed, students work on, and present, their final MA thesis project.

Course Work

The MA in Educational Innovation, Technology, and Entrepreneurship consists of three semesters of full-time study, 36 semester hours of course work, over a twelve month period. Students begin classes in August and finish the program by August of the year following entrance into the program.

Because the 36 semester hours of course work are completed in a 12-month period, this is a very concentrated program. As a result, only full time students are admitted and students may not enter the program at times other than the one specified above.

Internship

This is a professional degree, designed to prepare students to apply their learning in real-world contexts, with the goal of transforming education to benefit learners. With this goal in mind, an internship with an innovative educational organization is a central part of the program. The Research Triangle region has a large number of entrepreneurial and innovative organizations that work in education. The internship will give students hands-on experience with how learning occurs in real-world contexts. Most internship sites will require the student to provide their own transportation, although there are a small number that are accessible via public transportation.

Students will be matched with internship sites based on their goals for the program, and also on the needs of the hosting organization. Using a list of approved internship sites provided by the program, students will be responsible for making contact with the organization(s) they are most interested in, and applying to be an intern at that organization.

Some students will enter with their own entrepreneurial education ventures, either already started or in the idea conceptualization stage. With permission of the Program Director, these students may choose to develop their own venture as their internship. The Kenan-Flagler “Launch the Venture” program, which is designed to foster entrepreneurial ventures, might qualify as an internship substitute.

The student’s faculty adviser will be responsible for monitoring the educational value of the internship, and ensuring that the Internship Agreement is being followed by both the site and the intern. Students will discuss their internship experience weekly, in the required Integrative Seminar. The student’s faculty adviser will assign the grade for this course, in consultation with the internship coordinator and the Program Director.

For some students and some internship sites, there may be mutual value in students switching to a new site in their Spring semester. Such changes must be approved by the student’s advisor.